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Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Environmental Toxins

Goats & Environmental Toxins
by Carrie Eastman

Having worked as an environmental regulator for 16 years, this is a topic dear to my heart. Even 20 years ago, this was not a major concern. Today, things are different. Our animals are exposed to:
  • lead from old paint
  • pesticides and herbicides that blow in from neighboring farms or are in the feed & hay
  • aluminum and other metals in galvanized stock tanks
  • mercury from industry
  • ethoxyquin in black rubber buckets and feed tubs
  • lead and mold inhibitors from garden hoses
  • chemicals in fly sprays, vaccines, and dewormers
  • and now radioactive fallout from Japan

Any feed or hay produced these days, even organically, will have a toxin load from airborn fallout and rainwater.These toxins build up in the body over time, and are not easy to spot. This non-acute or non-lethal exposure affects all the body systems and is passed to offspring through mother's milk, as well as actually affecting the DNA.Possible symptoms include: allergies, agression/behavioral disorders, anemia, bone & joint disorders, cancer, diabetes, infertility, skin problems,thyroid problems, infections and birth defects. This exposure is why all my animals and my family get regular liver cleanses.

 We also do heavy metal cleanses because the liver does not recognize and filter out all the heavy metals. Historically, chelation therapy was considered the best way to remove the metals. However, it was mainly used on people, is very expensive, and can be risky. There is now another approach available. Zeolites are a naturally occuring crystalline mineral found in rock deposits and formed by volcanic activity. Zeolites attract and bind toxic particles such as heavy metals, radioactive particles and certain other toxins. Zeolites have also been shown to help balance blood sugar levels, balance the body's pH and support healthy immune function. Several forms of zeolite are commercially available. Always look for zeolite that has been cleaned and has particle sizes below 8 microns, so that it reaches the bloodstream.  My personal favorite brands right now are Total Zeolite (for people) and ACZNano for the livestock.  I add the drops to the feed, scaling the dose down by bodyweight, as the dose on the package is for an average weight person.

I also use clay and herbs to cleanse the liver and digestive tract of my animals and family regularly.  The horses and dogs typically get get a 28 day cleanse in spring and fall.  The goats at least get the fall cleanse.  The humans use clay weekly, and herbs as needed based on muscle testing.  I use Dynamite's Miracle Clay, Excel and also their Herbal Tonic.  I especially make sure to do a cleanse before goat breeding season starts, as I want my kids conceived from the cleanest genetic stock possible. Please contact me if you have more questions about toxins and my experiences with detoxification.   The dosages for horses and dogs are right on the labels.  For goats, I give 1 teaspoon Herbal Tonic per 60 pounds bodyweight in their feed once daily for 10 to 14 days, making sure I catch the full moon somewhere around day 5 to 7.  My goats get clay daily, as it is the binder in the Dynamite Pelleted Grain Ration.  Otherwise, I would give the goats 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon daily of Dynamite Excel or Dynamite Miracle Clay in their feed daily (either can be milled into a custom feed mix also).  The Excel also contains digestive aids and diatomaceous earth, and is my preferred product over the plain clay.

A nice side benefit from the Miracle Clay, Excel and Herbal Tonic is that all have anecdotally been reported to coincide with negative fecal tests.  (Basically, in my experience, they work just as well as chemical dewormers)  Clay and diatomaceous earth are the only 2 substances that parasites cannot adapt to, no matter how often you use them. 
You can find Dynamite Miracle Clay, Excel and Herbal Tonic at http://www.dynamitemarketing.com/carrieeastman 

Copyright ©2014 Carrie Eastman.

These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration, and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your veterinarian about any changes to your goat’s health program.

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